Burlington Emergency & Veterinary Specialists » Poison Prevention http://bevsvt.com Wed, 05 Jul 2017 18:29:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.18 Is pet insurance worth the upfront cash?http://bevsvt.com/2017/is-pet-insurance-worth-the-upfront-cash-2/ http://bevsvt.com/2017/is-pet-insurance-worth-the-upfront-cash-2/#comments Tue, 14 Feb 2017 16:23:09 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=2119 The question of pet insurance is a common topic for our clients. Investigative reporter Jennifer Costa spent hours researching the top pet insurance companies and found out this is a pretty complicated topic with an overwhelming number of options. Not all pet policies are created equal so plan on spending time on the phone with each company before picking a policy. “Pet insurances are really different. Just like in human medicine, you have to read the fine print as to what they cover and there’s very specific things you should look for,” said Dr. Garrett Levin, BEVS surgeon.

Like broad coverage. Only a few insurers pay for wellness visits, while most will cover hereditary conditions, accidents, illnesses and injuries. Watch for exceptions. Exam fees run $50 for an office visit to more than $100 for emergency care. WCAX found Trupanion and Healthy Paws do now cover this expense. A hidden cost to consider if your pet is a frequent flyer at the vet.

Check coverage limits. For most, unlimited coverage is standard. But Embrace and Petfirst cap annual payouts at $15,000 and $20,000 respectively. Not a big dealunless your pet comes down with a chronic costly condition. Understand your deductible. Annual deductibles are the most common. But Petfirst charges you a “per incident” deductible that resets every year. Trupanion charges per incident too, but you only pay the deductible for that condition once during the pet’s life.

Experts say in most cases pet insurance will save you money.

Reporter Jennifer Costa: Should people shop around?

Levin: Absolutely. Ask questions.

WCAX found it’s easier to get answers when you call the companies directly.

For a 2-year-old cat, monthly premiums ranged from $17 to $51. You could pay less if you chose a higher deductible or opted to pay more out of pocket.

After her ordeal, Leahy wanted maximum coverage including wellness protection. She asked her vet about each insurer, compared a half dozen policies for Great Danes, considered Magnus’ frequent health needs and opted for a pricier plan.

“The last thing you want to do is make a decision about your pet based on money,” said Leahy.

After research, we can’t say whether this is a good insurance company and this is a bad one. Quotes for a cat varied by about $35 a month. The most expensive one didn’t cover any more than the cheapest. Remember you can always adjust your premium or your deductible to fit your budget.

Before you call for a quote, check out “What’s Not Covered?” to ensure you are picking the best policy for your pet:

Check out the full story here, Is pet insurance worth the upfront cash?.

By Jennifer Costa, WCAX

 

www.petinsurance.com/whats-not-covered

www.petfirst.com/Our-Plans/Lifetime-Coverage-Exclusions.aspx

www.petsbest.com/coverage (exclusions are at the bottom)

http://trupanion.com/pet-insurance/faqs

www.gopetplan.com/terms-and-conditions-explained

www.embracepetinsurance.com/coverage/not-covered

www.healthypawspetinsurance.com/frequent-questions

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Toxic Foods for Petshttp://bevsvt.com/2015/toxic-foods-for-pets/ http://bevsvt.com/2015/toxic-foods-for-pets/#comments Thu, 28 May 2015 12:40:02 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=1697 Ever wonder what foods you can safely share with your pets? They may swoon you with those big, sweet eyes and tell you any food is OK to share but don’t fall into their adorable and convincing traps! The Pet Poison Helpline has put together a 1-minute video on toxic human foods. It won’t take long to watch and could save you and your furbaby a trip to the vets office!

 

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Poison Prevention Week for Petshttp://bevsvt.com/2015/poison-prevention-week-pets/ http://bevsvt.com/2015/poison-prevention-week-pets/#comments Fri, 13 Mar 2015 20:54:24 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=1661 by M. Kathleen Shaw, DVM
Vermont Veterinary Medical Association

Poison prevention week for pets is March 15th through the 21st. This annual observance started in 1961 to highlight the dangers of accidental poisonings in children, and is a great time to discuss potential dangers to our pets, as well.

In reviewing over 180,000 calls about pets exposed to potentially poisonous substances in 2012, the ASPCA’s Poison Control center reports that for the fifth straight year, prescription human medications were the top problem. 25,000 calls were taken in 2012: that’s almost 70 calls per day! The top three medications were heart/blood pressure pills, antidepressants, and pain medications. The next most common poisonous substance was insecticides, with 19,000 calls and over half of those were cats. Our feline friends are very susceptible to ingredients in many over the counter and veterinary products. Always read the label fully and check with your veterinarian before applying any topicals on a cat!

Over the counter human drugs were third, including drugs such as aspirin and Tylenol and even herbal and neutraceutical products. Coming in fourth were veterinary products such as flavored chew tabs for pets. In many cases, the entire bottle was consumed! Rounding out the top five were household items, including cleaning products.

Dogs are much more likely to get into trouble around the house than cats (nine of the top ten spots go to dogs), with Labrador Retrievers topping the list. They are followed by mixed breed dogs, Chihuahuas, Golden Retrievers, and Yorkies. Prevention consists of pet proofing your home in the same way you would child proof it: keep all potentially toxic substances up high or locked up.

If you suspect your pet has ingested any of the above items, chocolate, foods with xylitol sweetener (gum), a rodenticide, or any lawn and garden product, call your veterinarian immediately. If you are not sure if the product is toxic, call. It’s better to be safe than sorry. The ASPCA’s Poison Center also has a 24 hour hotline at 888-426-4435. Since 1978, they have handled over two million cases.

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The Vermont Veterinary Medical Association (VVMA) is a professional organization of more than 330 veterinarians dedicated to compassionate animal care and quality medicine. For more information, visit www.vtvets.org or call (802) 878-6888.

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