Burlington Emergency & Veterinary Specialists » Pet Care http://bevsvt.com Mon, 26 Jun 2017 16:39:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.18 Is pet insurance worth the upfront cash?http://bevsvt.com/2017/is-pet-insurance-worth-the-upfront-cash-2/ http://bevsvt.com/2017/is-pet-insurance-worth-the-upfront-cash-2/#comments Tue, 14 Feb 2017 16:23:09 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=2119 The question of pet insurance is a common topic for our clients. Investigative reporter Jennifer Costa spent hours researching the top pet insurance companies and found out this is a pretty complicated topic with an overwhelming number of options. Not all pet policies are created equal so plan on spending time on the phone with each company before picking a policy. “Pet insurances are really different. Just like in human medicine, you have to read the fine print as to what they cover and there’s very specific things you should look for,” said Dr. Garrett Levin, BEVS surgeon.

Like broad coverage. Only a few insurers pay for wellness visits, while most will cover hereditary conditions, accidents, illnesses and injuries. Watch for exceptions. Exam fees run $50 for an office visit to more than $100 for emergency care. WCAX found Trupanion and Healthy Paws do now cover this expense. A hidden cost to consider if your pet is a frequent flyer at the vet.

Check coverage limits. For most, unlimited coverage is standard. But Embrace and Petfirst cap annual payouts at $15,000 and $20,000 respectively. Not a big dealunless your pet comes down with a chronic costly condition. Understand your deductible. Annual deductibles are the most common. But Petfirst charges you a “per incident” deductible that resets every year. Trupanion charges per incident too, but you only pay the deductible for that condition once during the pet’s life.

Experts say in most cases pet insurance will save you money.

Reporter Jennifer Costa: Should people shop around?

Levin: Absolutely. Ask questions.

WCAX found it’s easier to get answers when you call the companies directly.

For a 2-year-old cat, monthly premiums ranged from $17 to $51. You could pay less if you chose a higher deductible or opted to pay more out of pocket.

After her ordeal, Leahy wanted maximum coverage including wellness protection. She asked her vet about each insurer, compared a half dozen policies for Great Danes, considered Magnus’ frequent health needs and opted for a pricier plan.

“The last thing you want to do is make a decision about your pet based on money,” said Leahy.

After research, we can’t say whether this is a good insurance company and this is a bad one. Quotes for a cat varied by about $35 a month. The most expensive one didn’t cover any more than the cheapest. Remember you can always adjust your premium or your deductible to fit your budget.

Before you call for a quote, check out “What’s Not Covered?” to ensure you are picking the best policy for your pet:

Check out the full story here, Is pet insurance worth the upfront cash?.

By Jennifer Costa, WCAX

 

www.petinsurance.com/whats-not-covered

www.petfirst.com/Our-Plans/Lifetime-Coverage-Exclusions.aspx

www.petsbest.com/coverage (exclusions are at the bottom)

http://trupanion.com/pet-insurance/faqs

www.gopetplan.com/terms-and-conditions-explained

www.embracepetinsurance.com/coverage/not-covered

www.healthypawspetinsurance.com/frequent-questions

]]>
http://bevsvt.com/2017/is-pet-insurance-worth-the-upfront-cash-2/feed/ 0
Certified Veterinary Pain Practitioner (CVPP)!http://bevsvt.com/2016/certified-veterinary-pain-practitioner-cvpp/ http://bevsvt.com/2016/certified-veterinary-pain-practitioner-cvpp/#comments Wed, 09 Nov 2016 21:12:45 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=2081 We are pleased to share that Dr.  Pamela Levin is now a Certified Veterinary Pain Practitioner (CVPP).  Certified Veterinary Pain Practitioners are veterinary professionals that the International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management (IVAPM) has recognized as having the training and skills necessary to practice animal pain management effectively and ethically.  IVAPM’s certification program is rigorous and comprehensive, covering pain medications, physical rehabilitation, therapeutic laser and acupuncture.  Certified Veterinary Pain Practitioners are committed to recognizing and treating pain in all their patients in the safest and most effective manner possible.  Dr. Pamela Levin is the only CVPP in the State of Vermont. We are so proud of this incredible accomplishment!

Dr. Levin is available for consultations on Tuesdays and Thursdays at BEVS.

]]>
http://bevsvt.com/2016/certified-veterinary-pain-practitioner-cvpp/feed/ 0
The Dangers of Blue-Green Algaehttp://bevsvt.com/2015/the-dangers-of-blue-green-algae/ http://bevsvt.com/2015/the-dangers-of-blue-green-algae/#comments Thu, 23 Jul 2015 22:54:57 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=1745 It began as an innocent walk in the park: A 9-month-old, 60 lb. German Shepherd mix went out for a stroll with her owner before spending 30 minutes alone in the backyard. When the dog reentered the house, her owner noticed that her eyes were rolling back and that her gait was uncoordinated. She also defecated in the house.

At the critical care facility, things only got worse: the pup was drooling, feverish and began seizing and vomiting. That was when veterinarians discovered the root of her illness: blue-green algae. The owner confirmed that the algae had been present in a backyard pond.

After 18 hours of critical care, including emergency intubation and ventilation for respiratory failure, the dog’s life was saved. She was discharged after three more days in the hospital, and fortunately, she is now back to her normal, happy self.  But blue-green algae can form almost anywhere and can be a danger to any unsuspecting pet parent. That’s why the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) wants to keep you informed about this toxic bacterium.

Members of the phylum Cyanobacteria, blue-green algae usually form on or near bodies of water during warm weather months. It is typically found in ponds and lakes, but can also be present in oceans, fresh water, damp soil, backyard fountains and even on rocks. Dogs can develop poisoning when they drink from or swim in contaminated water sources. If consumed, blue-green algae can cause severe neurologic or liver signs. Signs of blue-green algae toxicity include:

  • Seizures
  • Panting
  • Excessive drooling
  • Respiratory failure
  • Diarrhea
  • Disorientation
  • Vomiting
  • Liver failure
  • Death

Prevention is key. Don’t allow your pets to drink from stagnant ponds, lakes or other bodies of water that have bluish-green scum on the surface or around the edges. Blue-green algae cells can also stick to a pet’s fur and be ingested when the animal cleans itself, so think twice before allowing your pet to jump into a body of water.

If you think that your pet is ill or may have ingested a poisonous substance, please call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435 immediately!

 

Written by: ASPCA

Original Article here: http://www.aspca.org/blog/animal-poison-control-alert-dangers-blue-green-algae

]]>
http://bevsvt.com/2015/the-dangers-of-blue-green-algae/feed/ 0
Ten Most Common Pet Toxins of 2014http://bevsvt.com/2015/ten-most-common-pet-toxins-of-2014/ http://bevsvt.com/2015/ten-most-common-pet-toxins-of-2014/#comments Thu, 28 May 2015 12:50:51 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=1702 The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) in Urbana, IL., handled more than 167,000 calls involving pets exposed to possibly poisonous substances in 2014. Nearly 16% of those calls were from pet parents whose pets got into medicines intended for human use, putting this category at the top of the toxin list for the seventh year in a row.

Here are the 10 most common pet toxins of 2014 ranked in order of call volume:

  1. Human prescription medications are most often exposed to pets, as mentioned above. The prescriptions that caused the most concern correlated with the most popular medications prescribed to humans.
  2. Over-the-counter medications, including herbal and other natural supplements, attracted greater concern this year than in previous years resulting in approximately 25,000 calls. This category is exceptionally large, encompassing more than 6,900 different products.
  3. Insecticides dropped to the third slot this year, comprising 9.1% of calls to the APCC (15,000 cases). These products can be very dangerous, especially if the label directions are not followed.
  4. Household items were the cause for concern in more than 13,500 cases, especially paints and cleaning products.
  5. Human foods are appealing to pets, especially dogs. Dogs can get into serious trouble by ingesting onions, garlic, grapes, raisins and xylitol, a sugar substitute which can be life-threatening for animals. Approximately 13,200 cases involved human foods in 2014.
  6. Veterinary medications made up 7% of total cases in 2014. Pet parents should be aware that chewable medications are very tasty and pets might ingest an entire bottle if it is not kept out of their reach.
  7. Chocolate ingestion is very common. At the APCC, chocolate calls make up 6% of the total call volume—more than 30 calls a day! The darker the chocolate, the more potential it has to do harm.
  8. Plants represent approximately 5% of the calls to the APCC and moved up a spot since 2014. Most of these calls involve cats and houseplants.
  9. Rodenticides are made to kill mice and rats, but they can also kill pets if ingested. APCC handled more than 7,500 calls about rodenticides last year.
  10. Lawn and garden products round out the top ten, accounting for about 2.7% of all calls. Many of these exposures occurred because people did not store lawn and garden products out of the reach of pets.

Want more poison control information at your fingertips? Download our free APCC by ASPCA mobile app, which features a searchable database of more than 275 toxins as well as helpful information for pet parents of dogs, cats, horses and birds. The app helps users quickly and accurately identify common hazards.

If you have any reason to suspect your pet has ingested something toxic, please contact your veterinarian or the Animal Poison Control Center’s 24-hour hotline at (888) 426-4435.

 

Written By: ASPCA on Wednesday, April 15, 2015

]]>
http://bevsvt.com/2015/ten-most-common-pet-toxins-of-2014/feed/ 0