Burlington Emergency & Veterinary Specialists » Dogs http://bevsvt.com Mon, 26 Jun 2017 16:39:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.18 Pets in Vehicleshttp://bevsvt.com/2016/pets-in-vehicles-2/ http://bevsvt.com/2016/pets-in-vehicles-2/#comments Fri, 29 Jul 2016 14:32:21 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=2016 On Wednesday, the temperature in Williston was 85 degrees so we decided to put the dog Life-Meter to the test!  We affixed the decal to the inside of a car window and waited one hour before returning to the parking lot see how high the internal temperature of the car was.  To our surprise the inside temp had climbed to 130 degrees!

Our vehicles can quickly reach a temperature that puts pets at serious risk of illness and even death. Even on a day that doesn’t seem hot to us–and cracking the windows makes no difference.

Please do not leave your precious pets in your vehicle.

Estimated Vehicle Interior Air Temperature vs. Elapsed Time
Elapsed time Outside Air Temperature (F)
70 75 80 85 90 95
0 minutes707580859095
10 minutes899499104109114
20 minutes99104109114119124
30 minutes104109114119124129
40 minutes108113118123128133
50 minutes111116121126131136
60 minutes113118123128133138
> 1 hour115120125130135140

Courtesy Jan Null, CCM; Department of Geosciences, San Francisco State University

Symptoms of overheating in dogs include:

Heavy pantingElevated body temperature
Excessive thirstWeakness, collapse
Glazed eyesIncreased pulse and heartbeat
Vomiting, bloody diarrheaSeizures
Bright or dark red tongue, gumsExcessive drooling
StaggeringUnconsciousness

By the time a dog is exhibiting symptoms of heatstroke, it’s often too late to save him.

 

Written by: Aimee Gilfillan

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Today My Dog Had Surgeryhttp://bevsvt.com/2015/today-my-dog-had-surgery/ http://bevsvt.com/2015/today-my-dog-had-surgery/#comments Fri, 30 Oct 2015 16:38:20 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=1870 Yesterday, my rambunctious, three year old yellow lab mix Addison underwent a bilateral elbow arthroscopy procedure. Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure orthopedic surgeons use to visualize, diagnose and treat problems inside a joint. Addie was experiencing intermittent lameness that became more severe after exercise. Upon physical exam and joint palpation with Dr. Garrett Levin, DACVS it was suggested to move forward with radiographs and a CT scan to determine if there was elbow dysplasia and bone abnormalities. The CT report confirmed elbow dysplasia and elbow arthroscopy was performed on both elbow joints. A fragmented medial coronoid process was removed from both elbows which is like having a rock in your shoe! Addie is doing great the day after surgery, she is comfortable and walking well. She will continue to be on exercise restriction for 8 weeks and is looking forward to the 4 week mark so she can get in the pool for some exercise! 

addie

Even though I see animals undergo procedures everyday I was still a nervous dog mom throughout the procedure. Being a ‘client’ for a day helped remind me what it’s like to be on the other side, which is sometimes easy to forget because treatments and procedures become so routine. As always, I was amazed at the level of support and compassion given to me by my co-workers. We are all animal lovers and pet parents so even though much of what we see is routine, we can always empathize with the stress of having a sick pet. I am fortunate that Addison will make a full recovery (she is contently munching on a bone in the office right now) and has many hikes, walks and runs ahead of her.

Whitney Durivage, hospital manager at BEVS

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Pets in Vehicleshttp://bevsvt.com/2015/pets-in-vehicles/ http://bevsvt.com/2015/pets-in-vehicles/#comments Fri, 07 Aug 2015 16:35:21 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=1751

Every year, hundreds of pets die from heat exhaustion because they are left in parked vehicles. We’ve heard the excuses: “Oh, it will just be a few minutes while I go into the store,” or “But I cracked the windows…” These excuses don’t amount to much if your pet becomes seriously ill or dies from being left in a vehicle.

The temperature inside your vehicle can rise almost 20º F in just 10 minutes. In 20 minutes, it can rise almost 30º F…and the longer you wait, the higher it goes. At 60 minutes, the temperature in your vehicle can be more than 40 degrees higher than the outside temperature. Even on a 70-degree day, that’s 110 degrees inside your vehicle!

Your vehicle can quickly reach a temperature that puts your pet at risk of serious illness and even death, even on a day that doesn’t seem hot to you. And cracking the windows makes no difference.

Want numbers? An independent study showed that the interior temperature of vehicles parked in outside temperatures ranging from 72 to 96º F rose steadily as time increased. Another study​, performed by the Louisiana Office of Public Health, found that the temperatures in a dark sedan as well as a light gray minivan parked on a hot, but partly cloudy day, exceeded 125oF within 20 minutes.

Estimated Vehicle Interior Air Temperature v. Elapsed Time
Elapsed timeOutside Air Temperature (F)
707580859095
0 minutes707580859095
10 minutes899499104109114
20 minutes99104109114119124
30 minutes104109114119124129
40 minutes108113118123128133
50 minutes111116121126131136
60 minutes113118123128133138
> 1 hour115120125130135140
Courtesy Jan Null, CCM; Department of Geosciences, San Francisco State University

Watch an animated video about in-vehicle temperatures.

This study also found that cracking the windows had very little effect on the temperature rise inside the vehicle. This is definitely a situation where “love ‘em and leave ‘em” is a good thing. Please leave your pets at home at home when you can…they’ll be safe and happily waiting for you to come home.

…but wait, there’s more!

The risks associated with pets in vehicles don’t end with heatstroke. Just as you should always wear your seatbelt to protect you in case of a collision, your pet should always be properly restrained while in the vehicle. That means a secure harness or a carrier.

A loose, small pet could crawl down in the footwell, interfering with use of the brake or accelerator pedal. A small pet sitting in your lap could be injured or killed by the airbag or could be crushed between your body and the airbag in a collision, and a large pet leaning across your lap can interfere with your view of the road and can be injured by the air bag in a collision. Unrestrained pets could be thrown out or through windows or windshields in a collision. And not only could your pet be injured in the collision, but it might also increase your risk of collision by distracting you and taking your attention away from where it should be – on the road.

To learn more about the importance of restraining your pets, visit Paws to Click.

Most of us smile when we see a dog’s face happily hanging out a window, digging the ride and the smells wafting on the breeze, but this is a very risky venture for the dog for three reasons. One, it means your dog isn’t properly restrained – and we’ve already told you why that’s so important. Two, your dog is at high risk of eye, ear, face and mouth injury from airborne objects when it’s got its face hanging out the window. Three, letting your dog hang any part of its body out of the window increases the risk that (s)he could be thrown out of the vehicle during a collision, lose its balance and fall out of the open window during an abrupt turn or maneuver, or jump out of the vehicle to threaten another dog or a person.

And let’s not forget the severe dangers of driving with your dog in the bed of a pickup truck. Dogs can fall or jump from the truck bed and be injured or killed on impact, or be struck by other traffic. And just as letting your dog hang its head out of the window puts it at risk of injury from debris, a dog in a truck bed is even more exposed to airborne hazards. Using a appropriate-length tether may reduce the risk that your dog will exit the truck bed, but the tether could tangle, injure, or even choke your dog. If you must transport your dog in the bed of a pickup truck, use a secured and appropriately sized and ventilated dog kennel. (For more information, read our Dogs Traveling in Truck Beds literature review.)

Before you put your pet in the vehicle, ask yourself if you really need to take your pet with you – and if the answer is no, leave your pet safely at home. If you must take your pet with you, make sure (s)he is properly restrained so the trip is as safe as possible for both of you.

 

Original Post: AVMA https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/pets-in-vehicles.aspx

 

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Toxic Foods for Petshttp://bevsvt.com/2015/toxic-foods-for-pets/ http://bevsvt.com/2015/toxic-foods-for-pets/#comments Thu, 28 May 2015 12:40:02 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=1697 Ever wonder what foods you can safely share with your pets? They may swoon you with those big, sweet eyes and tell you any food is OK to share but don’t fall into their adorable and convincing traps! The Pet Poison Helpline has put together a 1-minute video on toxic human foods. It won’t take long to watch and could save you and your furbaby a trip to the vets office!

 

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Preventing Ticks on Your Petshttp://bevsvt.com/2015/preventing-ticks-on-your-pets/ http://bevsvt.com/2015/preventing-ticks-on-your-pets/#comments Tue, 26 May 2015 19:57:12 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=1687 Dogs are very susceptible to tick bites and tickborne diseases. Vaccines are not available for all the tickborne diseases that dogs can get, and they don’t keep the dogs from bringing ticks into your home. For these reasons, it’s important to use a tick preventive product on your dog.

Tick bites on dogs may be hard to detect. Signs of tickborne disease may not appear for 7-21 days or longer after a tick bite, so watch your dog closely for changes in behavior or appetite if you suspect that your pet has been bitten by a tick.

To reduce the chances that a tick will transmit disease to you or your pets:

  • Check your pets for ticks daily, especially after they spend time outdoors.
  • If you find a tick on your dog, remove it right away.
  • Ask your veterinarian to conduct a tick check at each exam.
  • Talk to your veterinarian about tickborne diseases in your area.
  • Reduce tick habitat in your yard.
  • Talk with your veterinarian about using tick preventives on your pet.

 

Note: Cats are extremely sensitive to a variety of chemicals. Do not apply any insect acaricides or repellents to your cats without first consulting your veterinarian!

Kill Ticks on Dogs

A pesticide product that kills ticks is known as an acaricide. Acaricides that can be used on dogs include dusts, impregnated collars, sprays, or topical treatments. Some acaricides kill the tick on contact. Others may be absorbed into the bloodstream of a dog and kill ticks that attach and feed.

Pros:

  • Helps to reduce the number of ticks in the environment
  • Prevents tickborne disease

Cons:

  • Tick bites can cause a painful wound and may become infected.
  • When bitten, a dog may become infected with a number of diseases. This depends on the type of tick, which diseases it is carrying (if any), and how quickly a product kills the feeding tick.

Examples of topically applied products (active ingredients):

  • Fipronil
  • Pyrethroids (permethrin, etc.)
  • Amitraz

Repel Ticks on Dogs

A repellent product may prevent the tick from coming into contact with an animal at all or have anti-feeding effects once the tick comes into contact with the chemical, thus preventing a bite.

Pros:

  • Prevents bite wounds and possible resulting infections
  • Prevents tickborne disease

Cons:

  • Will not reduce the number of ticks in the environment (doesn’t kill ticks)

Examples of topically applied products (active ingredients):

  • Pyrethroids (permethrin, etc.)

Reference to any commercial entity or product or service on this page should not be construed as an endorsement by the Government of the company, its products, or its services.

 

Content source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID)

Division of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD)

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Mala Boo’s Storyhttp://bevsvt.com/2015/mala-boos-story/ http://bevsvt.com/2015/mala-boos-story/#comments Wed, 08 Apr 2015 17:52:58 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=1669 Mala Boo is a beautiful, adventurous 8 year old Labrador. One day last October after returning from a  hike she began showing signs of neck pain. The neck pain became more severe and progressed to tetraparesis (unable to walk and very little movement of her 4 limbs). At BEVS she underwent a neurologic examination and CT scan showing a slipped disc (intervertebral disc disease), compressing the spinal cord at C5-C6 on her neck. Mala Boo’s amazing family decided to go through with surgery knowing a long road and tough recovery was ahead of them. The same day as the exam and CT, Mala Boo underwent a ventral slot (bone tunnel made on the spinal canal floor to retrieve the disc material compressing the spinal cord). Mala Boo was kept sedated and received different types of pain medication to control what we call wind up pain – a pain that persists even after the insult has been removed.

One of the most extraordinary moments in my career occurred 2 days post surgery while the owners were visiting.  Mala  Boo was still very painful and unable to move. We were going over all of the options and that prognosis can be good but recovery is long and difficult. At that moment, Mala moved her front limb for the first time since she became tetraparetic, and reached for her owner. At that moment, they said, we are going to continue, Mala deserves that support. After that, slow improvements could be observed daily. Mala would be able to hold her head up for few minutes which progressed to her moving her legs more vigorously and wagging her tail. Five days after surgery, Mala was discharged from the hospital, still unable to walk and on several pain medications. Mala’s mom Micheline cared for Mala every day, giving her pain medications, doing her home exercises, expressing her bladder and carrying her outside. Again, Mala showed daily improvements and 2 weeks after surgery, she was be able to stand with very little support and did not show any more signs of pain. The Vanovac family continued her exercises at home, holding her up for balancing exercises, doing range of motion, stimulating Mala to move with treats – luckily Mala Boo loves her treats! Five weeks after surgery, Mala could walk on her own and was enjoying the snow outside. What initially was a slow walk with some paw placing mistakes, gradually became a normal walk and finally Mala Boo (and her family) got her life back. Mala Book and her family have many more hikes ahead of them.

Written by: Dr. Helia Zamprogno, PhD, Practice Limited to Surgery

 

Mala Boo 2

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Emergency Tips for Petshttp://bevsvt.com/2015/emergency-instructions/ http://bevsvt.com/2015/emergency-instructions/#comments Fri, 20 Feb 2015 18:47:44 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=1649 If you are concerned or unsure if your pet needs emergency care, please call us at (802) 863-2387.  If your dog or cat ingested something poisonous please call your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline at 800-213-6680 for help immediately! The sooner a dog poisoning or cat poisoning is diagnosed, the easier, less expensive, and safer it is for your pet to get treated!

Seek emergency care immediately in these situations:

  • Unconsciousness, collapse or extreme lethargy
  • Suspected ingestion of a foreign body, harmful chemicals, human medications, or toxic plants
  • Trouble breathing
  • Trauma from fall or hit by moving vehicle
  • Extreme pain causing whining or shaking
  • Swollen and tense abdomen
  • Straining to urinate
  • Hemorrhage
  • Disorientation or seizures
  • Uncontrolled or prolonged vomiting and/or diarrhea
  • Prolonged straining without delivery of puppies or kittens

 

What to do if your dog or cat is poisoned:

  • Remove your pet from the area.
  • Check to make sure your pet is safe: breathing and acting normally.
  • Do NOT give any home antidotes.
  • Do NOT induce vomiting without consulting a vet or Pet Poison Helpline.
  • Call Pet Poison Helpline at 800-213-6680.
  • If veterinary attention is necessary, contact your veterinarian or emergency veterinary clinic immediately.

 

First Aid Kits for Dogs—5 Key Items to Pack

  1. Saline – This is used to flush out wounds when dirt or debris is present. You may use the bottle alone, or carry a syringe without a needle to apply the saline.  Saline is sold over the counter.
  2. Triple Antibiotic Ointment -This may be used for minor scrapes and cuts that your pet may encounter. A common one used is over the counter Bacitracin.  Do not allow your pet to lick the ointment off of the cut or scrape.
  3. Gauze and Wrap – If your pet gets a cut that is bleeding, it is important to be able to control it until you are able to get to a veterinarian. Gauze is a soft material that you may place over the bleeding wound to help control the bleeding. A soft wrap (such as vet wrap) is then applied to keep the gauze in place. The vet wrap sticks to itself so that it stays on, but not to your pet’s fur. They will love you extra when it’s time to remove the wrap. When wrapping, make sure to place a thumb or finger underneath the wrap to ensure that you are not wrapping too tight.
  4.  Fresh Hydrogen Peroxide – This is not to be used for cleaning , but rather to induce vomiting if your pet ingests something toxic. ALWAYS consult with your veterinarian or poison control center before giving your dog Peroxide. In some cases, vomiting should NOT be induced (such as ingestion of Kerosene, sharp objects or many other chemicals)
  5. Muzzle – When dogs injure themselves, they are painful and this may cause them to want to bite. It doesn’t mean that you have a mean dog, just that he/she is telling you that they hurt. A muzzle will help to prevent bites to you and/or helpers.
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Ruby’s Storyhttp://bevsvt.com/2014/rubys-story/ http://bevsvt.com/2014/rubys-story/#comments Thu, 20 Nov 2014 19:00:09 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=1582 Meet Ruby a  four year old dachshund who loves to run and play hard with her  corgi and 3 dachshund housemates. Ruby’s parents noticed that she was weak in her hind end when they went to bed in the evening and the following morning (approximately 10 hours later) she was able to bear weight on her hind limbs, but was not able to walk on her own. Her parents had a previous dog that needed back surgery, so they knew it was time to take her in to BEVS for emergency care.  They also noticed that she was not able to urinate and her symptoms were worsening quickly.  After a thorough neurological exam, it was noted that Ruby still had deep pain present (ability to feel and withdraw from pain in her feet), she was diagnosed with IVDD – Intervertebral Disc Disease and referred to our surgeon, Dr. Helia Zamprogno for CT/Myelogram and surgery. The CT and myelogram identify the herniated disc, allowing the surgeon to decide the location that requires surgery and the correct side to approach from. 85 – 95% of dogs that are taken to surgery with deep pain will walk again with surgical correction.  50% of dogs that do not have deep pain at the time of surgery will walk again with surgical correction within 24 hours of loosing deep pain. The longer a dog waits for surgery after losing deep pain the less likely they are to walk again, even after surgical correction. Recovery from surgery requires dedicated nursing care, physical rehab and time as it can take several weeks to regain the strength and proprioception needed to walk again. At home care involves a safe well padded area to rest, bladder management (regularly expressing the bladder when they are not able to urinate on their own) and giving daily medications.

Here Ruby is recuperating with her brother Max.

Ruby and Max

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Meet Abbyhttp://bevsvt.com/2014/meet-abby/ http://bevsvt.com/2014/meet-abby/#comments Wed, 30 Jul 2014 13:39:39 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=1549 Meet Abby. Abby loves to swim and chill out on the dock. Unfortunately, sometimes these two activities can produce the horrid hot spot–those painful, raw, moist, oozing sores your dog can get on their skin. If your pet has ever had one, I’m sure you can relate when I say hot spots are serious. Although more prevalent in the summer months, hot spots can appear any time of the year, on any breed of dog, at any age because most often these wounds are due to some sort of irritant or allergen that causes your dog to itch, such as fleas, food or treats, swimming or environmental pollutants, or matted, ungroomed fur. Once the skin surface has been opened by the scratching and biting, bacteria enters and infection quickly sets in–a small wound can become a huge wound in less than 24 hours. Don’t delay in seeking veterinary medical attention. Miss Abby’s wounds were clipped and cleaned by our staff and she was sent home with topical treatment, antibiotics, and the dreaded E-collar. Abby is on the road to recovery and we wish her the best!

To help prevent hot spots, keep your pet up to date on flea and tick prevention medicine, rinse your pet with a hose and dry thoroughly after a swim, speak with your vet about allergies, regularly check your pet for skin irritations and treat immediately.

A. Coburn                                                    A. Coburn2

Written by Aimee Gilfillan

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Pets and Garden Veggieshttp://bevsvt.com/2014/pets-garden-veggies/ http://bevsvt.com/2014/pets-garden-veggies/#comments Tue, 22 Jul 2014 13:55:19 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=1558 How does your garden grow? Silver bells? Cockle shells? Ours doesn’t have any of these either, but with all the great sun and shots of rain here and there, it is showing great promise for some yummy vegetables. Some vegies can be good for your pets too, but we wanted to list a few common garden plants that are toxic and to keep your pet away from–

Bulb Veggies: The basic rule of thumb is if a vegetable grows as an underground bulb, keep it out of Fido’s bowl. Onions, chives and leeks contain a chemical that can break down your dog’s red blood cells.
Garlic contains the same chemical, but in smaller amounts. Some dog foods and treats contain very low doses of garlic, which are generally considered safe by most veterinarians.
Potato and Tomato Plants: These two vegetables themselves are safe to eat, but the leaves and stems of the plants are very toxic to dogs.
Rhubarb: The leaves and stalk of the rhubarb are the toxic parts. Both the stalk and leaves contain oxalate crystals (although the leaves are more toxic), which deplete the calcium in the dog’s body.
Mushrooms: For dogs, all mushrooms are on the unsafe list.

You and your pet can both enjoy carrots, green beans, broccoli, and cucumbers! (In small amounts, cut up in bite- size portions)

Written By Aimee Gilfillan

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