Burlington Emergency & Veterinary Specialists » Toxic Foods for Pets http://bevsvt.com Wed, 05 Jul 2017 18:29:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.18 Holiday Feast and Your Petshttp://bevsvt.com/2015/holiday-feast-and-your-pets/ http://bevsvt.com/2015/holiday-feast-and-your-pets/#comments Fri, 30 Oct 2015 13:45:28 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=1867 BY Dr. Garrett Levin, DVM, Diplomate ACVS

As the holiday season draws near, we look forward to celebrating with family and friends.  Our homes fill with the wonderful scents of indulgent food and treats.  As tasty as these foods are for us, they can be problematic for dogs.

Dietary indiscretion describes gastrointestinal upset that occurs when a dog ingests something that its body cannot tolerate causing irritation and inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract.  The most common cause is when animals get into the trash or are fed people food (“table scraps”).

Most cases of dietary indiscretion are mild and do not have lasting consequences.  However, some dogs can suffer severe illness that require more intensive treatment.  Pancreatitis is a painful and sometimes life threatening condition resulting from severe inflammation of the pancreas.  Dogs that consume non digestible items (such as bones) can develop intestinal obstructions or perforations that are surgical emergencies.

Common clinical signs of dietary indiscretion:

  • Diarrhea – small amounts of blood may be noted in the feces
  • Loss of appetite and nausea
  • Vomit
  • Lethargy
  • Loud intestinal noises
  • Pacing, panting, whining, or showing other signs of abdominal pain and discomfort

Many cases of dietary indiscretion are diagnosed based on symptoms and physical examination by a veterinarian.  In severe cases, veterinarians may perform blood and fecal tests, perform abdominal radiographs (x-rays) and abdominal ultrasound (sonogram), as well as other diagnostics to rule out other concurrent abnormalities associated with the clinical signs.

Many mild cases of dietary indiscretion resolve if the dog is fed a special, easily digestible diet “bland diets” such as boiled chicken and rice.  More severe cases of dietary indiscretion can result in dehydration and require hospitalization.  Please consult with your primary veterinarian if the clinical signs do not quickly resolve on their own.  If your primary veterinarian is closed, please call Burlington Emergency and Veterinary Specialists (BEVS) at (802) 863-2387.  BEVS is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year to advise you on the appropriate actions with regards to your pet’s symptoms.

Here are some additional tips how to keep your pet safe this time of year during your holiday feast:

  • Keep garbage in a secure container
  • Keep food in the cupboard or refrigerator
  • Don’t leave food on the counter or table
  • Don’t feed your pet people food (“table scraps”).
  • Don’t give your pet bones to chew on
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Ten Most Common Pet Toxins of 2014http://bevsvt.com/2015/ten-most-common-pet-toxins-of-2014/ http://bevsvt.com/2015/ten-most-common-pet-toxins-of-2014/#comments Thu, 28 May 2015 12:50:51 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=1702 The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) in Urbana, IL., handled more than 167,000 calls involving pets exposed to possibly poisonous substances in 2014. Nearly 16% of those calls were from pet parents whose pets got into medicines intended for human use, putting this category at the top of the toxin list for the seventh year in a row.

Here are the 10 most common pet toxins of 2014 ranked in order of call volume:

  1. Human prescription medications are most often exposed to pets, as mentioned above. The prescriptions that caused the most concern correlated with the most popular medications prescribed to humans.
  2. Over-the-counter medications, including herbal and other natural supplements, attracted greater concern this year than in previous years resulting in approximately 25,000 calls. This category is exceptionally large, encompassing more than 6,900 different products.
  3. Insecticides dropped to the third slot this year, comprising 9.1% of calls to the APCC (15,000 cases). These products can be very dangerous, especially if the label directions are not followed.
  4. Household items were the cause for concern in more than 13,500 cases, especially paints and cleaning products.
  5. Human foods are appealing to pets, especially dogs. Dogs can get into serious trouble by ingesting onions, garlic, grapes, raisins and xylitol, a sugar substitute which can be life-threatening for animals. Approximately 13,200 cases involved human foods in 2014.
  6. Veterinary medications made up 7% of total cases in 2014. Pet parents should be aware that chewable medications are very tasty and pets might ingest an entire bottle if it is not kept out of their reach.
  7. Chocolate ingestion is very common. At the APCC, chocolate calls make up 6% of the total call volume—more than 30 calls a day! The darker the chocolate, the more potential it has to do harm.
  8. Plants represent approximately 5% of the calls to the APCC and moved up a spot since 2014. Most of these calls involve cats and houseplants.
  9. Rodenticides are made to kill mice and rats, but they can also kill pets if ingested. APCC handled more than 7,500 calls about rodenticides last year.
  10. Lawn and garden products round out the top ten, accounting for about 2.7% of all calls. Many of these exposures occurred because people did not store lawn and garden products out of the reach of pets.

Want more poison control information at your fingertips? Download our free APCC by ASPCA mobile app, which features a searchable database of more than 275 toxins as well as helpful information for pet parents of dogs, cats, horses and birds. The app helps users quickly and accurately identify common hazards.

If you have any reason to suspect your pet has ingested something toxic, please contact your veterinarian or the Animal Poison Control Center’s 24-hour hotline at (888) 426-4435.

 

Written By: ASPCA on Wednesday, April 15, 2015

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Toxic Foods for Petshttp://bevsvt.com/2015/toxic-foods-for-pets/ http://bevsvt.com/2015/toxic-foods-for-pets/#comments Thu, 28 May 2015 12:40:02 +0000 http://bevsvt.com/?p=1697 Ever wonder what foods you can safely share with your pets? They may swoon you with those big, sweet eyes and tell you any food is OK to share but don’t fall into their adorable and convincing traps! The Pet Poison Helpline has put together a 1-minute video on toxic human foods. It won’t take long to watch and could save you and your furbaby a trip to the vets office!

 

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